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President Biden has certainly checked out of Afghanistan, but he will never be able to leave behind his calamitous reputation as the weakest commander-in-chief since President Carter took office in 1977. At home, the citizenry grapples with soaring inflation—caused in great part by the chief executive's persistent reticence to call upon the Federal Reserve to raise overnight lending rates—evoking in the mind of the consumer images of gas lines and the high prices of the early 1980s. Weak posturing toward the Chinese Communist Party and the Russian oligarchy begs the question: how long will Taiwan and the Ukraine remain independent from impending Sino-Soviet overlordship? Moreover, disastrous foreign policy leading to the endangerment of American citizens and allies in Afghanistan will remain indelible marks that serve to tarnish President Biden's legacy and demonstrate his complete incompetence as a leader, effectively disqualifying the aged Delawarian Senator from sitting in the Oval Office. Of course, we could pretend that there was not a better way to leave Afghanistan. Or, alternatively, the President could have left the skeleton force of 2,500 or so troops who were already in Afghanistan, realizing that our window to leave was already far in the past. Once the Afghan military's fortunes were married to the presence of ours in the middle eastern country, there was no beneficial way to withdraw our military entirely. Yet, hubris has gotten the best of our addled President, and even though we are 'leaving' Afghanistan, the President has made his mark there forever—and in the worst way possible.

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